Business International:

Managing Cross-Cultural Differences

Examples of Cross-Cultural Differences

Chinese vs. Americans

 

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Cultural Differences

 

Learning profiles of 20 countries are provided in the mini-course

Harnessing Cultural Intelligence

HARNESSING CULTURAL INTELLIGENCE (CQ) - Building Cross-cultural Competence and Leveraging Diversity (mini-course, PowerPoint presentation download, Vadim Kotelnikov, One World One Way Many Paths)

 Societal, Institutional, and Value Differences between Chinese and Americans

Adapted from "Bridging US-China" Cross-Cultural Differences Using Internet and Groupware Technologies", Zhouying Jin, Robert M. Mason, and Peter P. Yum

Societal and Institutional Differences

Aspects

China

United States

Ethnic Culture

  • Centered around "relationships"

  • "Reclusive", each minding his/her own business (especially with "strangers" and people outside of the relationship network)

  • Centered around "individuals"

  • "Messianic": "let's save the world"

Be Different and Make a Difference!

Source of Trust

Trust those around you; don't "lose face" and credibility by failing to live up to written or oral agreements

Trust the contract; don't get into legal hassles by not fulfilling the agreement

Business Culture

Quiet and reserved; clumsy communicators

Outspoken; eloquent; effective communicators

Negotiation Style

Group decision; final say by the "boss"

More individual authority and distributed decision making

Dealing with Business Counterparts

Indirect; courteous; take things personally; long memory for both favors and humiliations

Direct; more matter-of-factly; memory for conflict superceded by business objective

Ability to Make Immediate Response

Weak

Strong

Value Differences

Aspects

China

United States

Interpersonal

"Relationship" comes first

"Economics" comes first

On "Humility"

"Humility" viewed as a virtue

"Humility" is a sign of weakness; there is every reason for the able to be proud

Time Horizon

Accountable by the generation (~30 years)

Accountable by the quarter (~3 months)

What Commands Respect

Respect for seniority, wisdom, ability

Respect for success, achievement, wealth

On "Family"

Children should learn to respect the elder, love the young, and rely on the "extended family"

Children should learn to be independent

On "the Strong" and "the Weak"

It is not righteous to bully

It is an honor to win; business is all a competition; it is only natural that the weak is preyed on by the strong

Discipline (in following procedures and schedules)

Strong

Depends on the individual

Tolerance of Diversity / Openness to Alternative (possibly opposing) Ideas

Openly very receptive; but actually, less so

More open

Shame or Humiliation

Long memory; need and urge to exonerate

Tends to be superceded by business priorities

Priorities

Mixed: business, individual, factional, nationalistic, and political

Almost strictly business

   

HARNESSING CULTURAL INTELLIGENCE (CQ) - Building Cross-cultural Competence and Leveraging Diversity (mini-course, PowerPoint presentation download, Vadim Kotelnikov, One World One Way Many Paths)

Harness Cultural Intelligence

Cross-Cultural Communication

Colors: Some Emotions and Symbolizations They Can Cause

The Power of Balance

Yin and Yang

The Five Basic Elements of the Universe

Harnessing the Power of Diversity

Synergy

Meditation: Seven Masters, One Path

World Cultures, Philosophies, and Religions

East vs. West

Chinese Proverbs

Buddhism

Buddha

Buddhism About Happiness

Christianity

Confucianism

Confucius

Turning Opportunities To Your Advantage: 5Ws I-Ching Advice

Lao Tzu

Business Plan Composed of the Quotes from Tao Te Chin

Zen

Zen Proverbs, Sayings, and Quotes

Feng Shui for Life and Business

Pearls of Wisdom

Confucius Quotes

Sun Tzu: 'The Art of War'

Enneagram

Enneagram Analysis: Styles of Selected World Cultures

Business International

The Tao of Business Success

The Five Minds of a Manager

Competitive Advantage: US versus Japan

Cross-Cultural Differences: China and United States

Russians: Comparative Character Features (a slide show)

Kaizen Culture: Implementation in Japan and the West

Negotiating

Conduct During Negotiations

Jokes

Cross-Cultural Differences

Case Studies

Asian Home Gourmet Brand

Managing Cultural Differences

Culture Dimension Scores for Selected Countries

12 Tips for Global Business Travelers

 

 

 

Are Chinese executives smarter than their American counterparts?

Source: TeleSmart and Fortune

TeleSmart conducted a study of the leadership skills of 3,000 top executives in China. The results reveal a distinct competitive advantage over the US.

The study compared the scores of Chinese executives against those of US executives using TalentSmart's Emotional Intelligence Appraisal test.

Global editions covered this study the largest of its kind ever conducted:

One recent study suggests that when it comes to emotional intelligence, or EQ, the answer is yes, EQ measures the ability to blend reason with feelings. This Summer 3,000 Chinese executives from the public and private sector were surveyed by TeleSmart, the leading provider of emotional intelligence tests. The appraisal measures what people do and say in the workplace and in all four categories self-awareness, social awareness, self-management, and relationship management the Chinese executives outscored American businessmen who have taken the test. In the first two categories the results were statistically insignificant, but when it comes to self-management and relationship management, the Chinese scored about 15 points higher. "It was surprising to see such a large gap," says Travis Bradberry, the president and co-founder of TalentSmart. "Self-management and relationship management are so important to executive's job performance that this finding does not bode well for U.S. competitive advantage in the global economy."